Meet the Doctoral Students

Michelle Chambers

MSW from UNC-Chapel Hill

Research Interests: Substance abuse, African American women, child welfare involvement

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Michelle’s Biography

Michelle Chambers obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Studies and completed her Master’s degree in Social Work at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Michelle is currently employed at the University of NC at Chapel Hill. She works in the Family and Children’s Resource Program training social workers that are currently employed in NC Social Services agencies in child welfare. Ms. Chambers is also the project manager for the NC Child Welfare Education Collaborative Program. Michelle is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) and Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist (LCAS) and currently owns a mental health group practice where she and her colleagues provide outpatient therapy to those with mental health and substance use issues.

Michelle is interested in African American women with substance use disorders and/or are dually diagnosed and the impact of culturally sensitive treatment. Michelle wishes to explore this phenomenon as there appears to be a dearth of research. Michelle would like to explore the intersectionality of the issue and begin to develop a culturally competent intervention that can be implemented across
disciplines.

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Denise Dawson

MSW from East Carolina University

Research Interests: social determinants of health and health disparities of adults with chronic illness & mental health disorders.

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Denise’s Biography

Denise Shavon Dawson received a Master of Social Work degree from East Carolina University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from UNC-Chapel Hill. She is a licensed clinical social worker and licensed clinical addiction specialist. She joined the Ph.D. program after nearly a decade of program management and psychotherapy practice, including working with the U.S. Department of Defense, Duke Medical Center, UNC-Chapel Hill, City of Durham, and private practice. Ms.
Dawson has worked extensively in communities, schools, and medical clinics with adults with mental health, chronic illness, and domestic violence issues in Durham and Fayetteville, NC.

Ms. Dawson’s research interests include investigating social determinants of health and health disparities of marginalized groups with chronic illnesses and mental health disorders. Ms. Dawson endeavors to conduct research that examines the link between chronic illness and behavioral health symptoms.
Although locally driven, she is also interested in exploring health disparities in international settings.
Ms. Dawson returned to school to critically investigate the etiology of the medical and behavioral health challenges patients exhibited in clinical practice.

Click for Denise’s Selected Accomplishments

Independent Research Collaborations with Faculty:

  1. Teletherapy: Is it the Way of the Future for Chronically Ill Patients
  2. Black Youth Suicide & Resiliency Project

Awarded Grants:

  1. National Science Foundation, I-Corps Innovation Grant, $3000
  2. American Heart Association, assisted community partner Message and a Meal staff with obtaining agency funding for their Faith & Fitness hypertension management program $9,630

Lyneisha Dukes

MSW from Fordham University

Research Interests: incarcerated women and men, incarcerated mothers, HIV prevention, and racial equity.

Matriculated Fall 2020

Click for Lyneisha’s Biography

Lyneisha Dukes graduated from Fordham University in NY, NY with her Masters in Social Work with a concentration in Human Service Leadership. After attaining her degree she acquired her LMSW and chose to pursue a macro leadership track at one of NYC largest social service agencies. There, she led the Intern and Volunteer Department. As a liaison she connected community members, donors, and students to various sectors of social work practice including Domestic Violence, Early Childhood Mental Health, Transition Age Foster Care Youth, Intellectual and Developmentally Disabled, and Adults with Mental Health Challenges. Lyneisha prides herself on her commitment to Racial Equity and Inclusivity. She led a number of agency wide events to engage staff, students, and volunteers in ongoing learning grounded in Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Lyneisha has supported qualitative research studies which explore the use of PReP as a HIV Prevention mechanism for incarcerated women and individuals with histories of incarceration. Lyneisha currently serves as the research assistant for the Essential Women of Color study, which explores the coping of women of color who have been deemed essential during COVID-19. Lyneisha’s scholarship will focus on the coping mechanisms of incarcerated mothers. Her research interests include: incarcerated women and men, incarcerated mothers, HIV prevention, and racial equity.

Zenobia Fennell

MSW from the Joint MSW Program at North Carolina A&T State University & the University of North Carolina Greensboro

Research Interests: Spirituality and Social Media

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Zenobia’s Biography

Zenobia B. Fennell received a Master of Social Work degree in the Joint MSW collaborative at North Carolina A&T State University and UNC-Greensboro, a Master’s of Divinity from Wake Forest School of Divinity, and a Doctorate of Ministry at United Theological Seminary. She joined the Ph.D. program after serving as an adjunct professor at Hood Theological Seminary in Salisbury, NC. Additionally, she’s worked in community mental health as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and a Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist. She’s worked with disabled veterans, geriatric, adults, children/adolescents, and serous and persistent mentally ill (SPMI) populations in outpatient settings located in Greensboro, Lexington, and Winston-Salem, NC. She currently serves as a therapist in the Clinical Unit of the Forsyth County Department of Social Services where in addition to providing specialized trauma related care for children/adolescents in foster care, she also assists with facilitating trauma workshops for the
staff in the agency’s Family and Children’s Division.

Zenobia’s research interest is in the area of, Spirituality and Social Media, as she explores the effects social media has on spiritual practices and faith-based institutions that assist in supporting community benevolence, emergency assistance, and social programs. Zenobia returned to school to analyze the trends and implications associated with the decline of these institutions and how individuals are seeking spiritual well-being via social media.

Vannessa Gharbi

MSW from the Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis

Research Interests: Mental health, substance use, health disparities, and caregiving among Aging Adults and People of Color (POC).

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Vannessa’s Biography

Vannessa received her Bachelor of Social Work degree at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and her Master of Social Work degree at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. She joined the Ph.D. program after a rewarding career as a manager, faculty instructor, field supervisor, clinical social worker, case manager and International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant serving clients in homes, hospitals, community medical clinics and private practice.

Vannessa’s research agenda is focused on the experiences of marginalized and underrepresented communities with an emphasis on People of Color (POC) and Aging Adults. She is especially interested in how people are impacted by inequities and how they manifest resilience and recovery when faced with health, mental health, and substance use challenges. Vannessa assumes a pragmatic stance when approaching research questions in order to incorporate methods that will provide the most utility under the specific research conditions at hand that will best inform professional practice. Her research interests and her approach are grounded in her interdisciplinary practice experience in community-based and healthcare settings.

Keya Glover

MSW from University of South Carolina, Columbia

Research Interests: African American mental health and culturally relevant practices, mental health and African American college students, meditation and mindfulness

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Keya’s Biography

Keya Glover received a Master of Social Work degree at the University of South Carolina – Columbia and a Bachelor degree of Social Work from Bennett College. She joined the JPh.D. program after nearly twenty years of direct care social work practice in the areas of child welfare, hematology social work and community mental health. She currently provides psychotherapy to college students within a local HBCU counseling center.

Keya’s research interests include identifying culturally relevant mental health practices within the African American college student population, specifically but not limited to mindful meditation. On a broader scale, she is also interested in exploring issues related to the experiences of the African American population and their mental well- being. Keya returned to school to further learn about these experiences and to identify culturally relevant practices that effectively address the unique challenges she encountered in her years of serving this underserved population.

Aalih Hussein

MSW from Marywood University

Research Interests: Muslim American women and mental health; Millennial and first generation Muslim American women.

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Aalih’s Biography

Aalih Hussein received an accredited Master of Social Work degree at the Marywood University and a Bachelor of Social Work degree from East Stroudsburg University. Upon completion of her Bachelor’s degree, she practiced Oncology Social Work for 3 years in East Stroudsburg, PA.

Aalih’s research interests include the intersecting identities of Muslim American women and their mental health. More specifically, she hopes to focus on Millennial and first generation Muslim American women. She hopes to provide insight about a misunderstood population in America.

Aalih’s professional goals include giving voice to the voiceless through research and teaching. She hopes to engage in a sustained dialogue to create a transformative classroom and body of research.

Click for Aalih’s Selected Accomplishments

Fall 2020

Guest Lecture:
Guest Lecture, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill September 2020
Theresa Palmer, MSW. Master of Social Work Program.
Discussed navigating the identity of a Muslim American woman by providing
personal and professional examples in the Confronting Oppression & Institutional Discrimination class

Independent Research:
Barriers to Diabetic Care management for Muslim Americans (In progress)
Role: Co-Investigator
Georgia State University and North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University
No Salary Support

Accepted Conference Presentations:

  1. Hussein, A & Vance, M. Brave Classrooms for Diverse Bodies: Employing Fanonian Theory to Understand Muslim American Women. Council of Social Work Education 2020 Annual Program Meeting. Denver, Colorado. 12 November 2020.
  2. Parker, Gharbi, Glover, & Hussein. PrEP at an HBCU: A Male’s Perspective. Council of Social Work Education 2020 Annual Program Meeting. Denver, Colorado. 12 November 2020.
  3. Varker, Hussein, Gonzalez, Simmons, & Arias Orozco. Within Our Skin: Multicultural Reflections of Passionate Pedagogy. American Educational Studies Association 2020 Annual Program. San Antonio Texas. 28 October 2020.

Spring & Summer 2020



Guest Lectures

  1. Guest Lecture, North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University
    June 2020
    Dr. Sharon Parker, Joint Master Social Work Program
    Discussed navigating the identity of a Muslim American woman by providing
    personal and professional examples in the Social Work and Human Diversity class
  2. Guest Lecture, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
    February 2020
    Theresa Palmer, MSW. Master of Social Work Program
    Discussed navigating the identity of a Muslim American woman by providing personal and professional examples in the Confronting Oppression & Institutional Discrimination class

Research:

  1. African Americans Living with Sickle Cell Disease: Patient Perception of their Provider Experiences Post New Guidelines for Prescribing Opioid Medications
    February 2020
    Role: Project Coordinator, Co-Primary Investigator
    No Salary Support
  2. Perspectives of HIV Prevention Among Incarcerated Women: Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis as a Potential Biomedical HIV Intervention
    April 2018 – present
    University of North Carolina Center for AIDS Research Developmental Award Funder: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, National Institutes of Health
    Role: Graduate Research Assistant
    Amount: $30,000
  3. PrEP at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Subaward)
    April 2017- present
    Duke University Subcontract- National Institutes of Health
    Role: Graduate Research Assistant
    Amount: $1,400
  4. Self-care Perceptions of Muslim American Women
    Summer 2020
    University of North Carolina Greensboro, School of Health and Human Sciences
    Role: Primary Investigator
    Amount: $2,000

Misc:
Council of Social Work Education Abstract Reviewer 2020 for the following tracks:

  • Islam and Muslims track
  • Feminist Track
  • Cultural Competence track

Lashaunda Lucas

MSW from East Carolina University

Research Interests: self-worth development for women of color and how it hinders or enhances performance in relationships, the workplace and academic settings.

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Lashaunda’s Biography

Lashaunda Lucas is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who received her Master’s of Social Work from East Carolina University. Lashaunda’s experience includes serving as
an Outpatient Therapist for youth and families involved with the Department of Juvenile Justice, persons with mental health diagnosis, and in Foster care and Adoption.
Lashaunda is currently an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Shaw University.

Lashaunda’s research interests include evaluating factors and life experiences that influence self-worth in women. More specifically, her intention is to explore self-worth development for women of color and how it hinders or enhances performance in relationships, the workplace and academic settings.

Leigh Norwood

MSW from UNC Greensboro and NC A&T State University (JMSW)

Research Interests: Supervision and training within social work training programs; the impact of oppressed identities on opportunities and experiences in field training programs.

Matriculated Fall 2020

Click for Leigh’s Biography

Leigh Norwood is a licensed clinical social worker with more than 16 years in the field. She received her Master’s of Social Work from the JMSW Program at UNC Greensboro and NC A&T State University. Her experience includes acute trauma response in a local police and area mental health collaborative program, as well as managed care and intensive community-based program administration. Currently, Leigh serves as the Assistant Director at a university counseling center where she provides individual and group therapy, in addition to administrative supervision of senior staff. Training and supervision are a significant area of interest for Leigh and she has clinically supervised practicum students and provisionally licensed social workers for a number of years.

Her research interests have evolved from this experience, and she currently seeks to examine the training opportunities offered for social work trainees, at the master’s and post master’s level. In particular, Leigh wants to explore the disparities in field training opportunities based on personal identity (race/ethnicity), professional identity (social work), and the intersection of the two. Leigh believes that the marginalization and oppression, as it is experienced by social work practitioners who work in the mental health field, is an important area to study in order to move the profession forward.

Lubaba Mitchell

MSW from Fordham University

Research interests: Impact of preventive/supportive community resources on child protective services and juvenile justice. Also, engagement and retention practices in the workplace.

Matriculated Fall 2020

Click for Lubaba’s Biography

Lubaba Mitchell graduated from City College (City University of New York) in 2000 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology. She went on to complete a Master of Social Work degree at Fordham University in 2005 and a Master of Public Administration degree from Appalachian State University in 2012.

Lubaba has worked for many years in the field of family and child welfare, with experience in group homes, supportive housing, foster care casework, child protective services and juvenile justice. At each step of her career, Lubaba has pondered how clients might be better served with resources that support their needs, and whether such resources can be preventive rather than reactive. A major focus of her Public Administration degree was the engagement and retention of workers that provide services, with the idea that skilled and energized workers provide more effective and efficient services.

Lubaba joined the faculty of Forsyth Technical Community College in 2018 as the Field Work Liaison and an Instructor.

Neema Olagbemiro

MPH from University of Tennessee Knoxville

Research Interests: Mental Health, Health Disparities, Substance Abuse and STI’s in Refugees and Minority populations.

Matriculated Fall 2020

Click for Neema’s Biography

Neema Olagbemiro received a Bachelor of Arts in Information Systems Management with a minor in Sociology from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and a Master’s in Public Health from the University of Tennessee Knoxville. Her professional work experience includes roles at the county and state level during which she managed and oversaw disease intervention programs and worked with various at-risk target populations ranging from refugee’s to inmates in the criminal justice system.

Neema’s broad research interests include the exploration and employment of social work competencies in humanitarian emergencies. More specifically, she seeks to explore the extent to which the presence and or absence of such competencies, either hinders or enhances occurrences of substance abuse and mental health when dealing with migrant and refugee populations affected by humanitarian emergencies.

Theresa Palmer

MSW from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Research Interests: diversity, oppression, microaggression, and effective pedagogy in the context of social work education

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Theresa’s Biography

M. Theresa Palmer received a Master of Social Work degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Field Education for UNC-Chapel Hill’s Winston-Salem Program.

Her research interests are in the areas of diversity, oppression, microaggression, and effective pedagogy in the context of social work education as well as issues related to the health and well-being of children, adolescents, and families.

Michael Pearson

MSW from IUPUI

Research Interests: the impact of anxiety as protective and risk factors, addictions, and social determinant of health for homeless women

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Michael’s Biography

Michael C. Pearson received a Master of Social Work from Indiana University Purdue University with a focus on MSW in Mental Health and Addictions. Michael’s post MSW experience include working with disadvantaged populations, homelessness, and housing. He has experience leading seminars, classes and groups that address special interest topics and the dynamics of personal development.

Michael’s research interest includes the effects of homelessness on women. He would like to establish a facility that utilizes research to improve the level of function of homeless women’s housing situation, mental health, and substance abuse. Specifically, Michael has been examining the impact of anxiety as protective and risk factors, addictions and social determinant of health for homeless women.

Currently, Michael is analyzing a secondary data set from the Gain ss to explore the impact of internal and external factors affecting the homeless population.

Click for Michael’s Selected Accomplishments
  • Spring 2020 Presentation and Awarding for Graduate Research Expo on Entry & Exit Dynamics of Homelessness—supporting faculty in research review Dr. Despard, UNCG.
  • Summer 2020 Funded Assistantship to conduct research on Fathers: fathering without a home– supporting faculty topic review by Dr. Poole and research supervision by Dr. Despard.
  • Fall 2020 Grant Proposal for research on Racial Equity Community Grant on Homeless Prevention Strategies—Supporting Faculty on topic review and CBPR review Dr. Monico, UNCG
  • Fall 2020 Proposal for Sociological Initiative Foundation Grant for Improving Disruptions and Interruptions in housing Services —Supporting Faculty by Dr. Monico, UNCG
  • Spring 2021 Present at UNCG Virtual Conference Lecture Series—Prevention Strategies: COIVD-19 and homeless public Health Concerns—Supporting faculty Dr. Monico

Dontae’ Roberts

MSW from the Jane Adams School of Social Work

Research Interests: in macro social work and program development, epigenetics, fatherhood

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Dontae’s Biography

J. Dontae’ Roberts received a Master of Social Work degree at the Jane Adams School of Social Work with a concentration in Urban Health and Community Development. He received the Licensed Clinical Social Worker certification and has practiced at the Veteran Affairs for 5 years, as well as a research assistant at UNC- Greensboro. He joined the Ph.D. program after nearly a decade of psychotherapy practice and medical social work working on multiple interdisciplinary teams.

Dontae’s research interest is in macro social work and program development. He is also interested in epigenetics, which is how the environment can influence gene expression and lastly he is interested in fatherhood; he believes that strong family programs have to include the voice of the father. He returned to school to think creatively about the challenges he observed as a practitioner and researcher.

Click for Dontae’s Selected Accomplishments

Dontea’s research on epigenetic awareness and fatherhood was accepted into the 2021 Millennial Social Work Conference. He is also a Child Well-Being Research Fellow and The Moynihan Fatherhood Fellow.

Kathryn Roosevelt

MSW from Florida Gulf Coast University

Research Interests: Older adults associated with pre-retirement planning and post-retirement wellness

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Kathryn’s Biography

Kathryn Roosevelt received her Mater of Social Work degree from Florida Gulf Coast University and a Bachelor of Social Work from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She became part of the first Ph.D. cohort with the Social Work joint program at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University and the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Kathryn did this after ten years in the field post MSW, working in a variety of settings but always with the focus on aging.

Kathryn’s research interest continues to focus on aging, most specifically in understanding the retirement process. Kathryn’s hope with her research is to identify the most valuable resources post-retirement, and how to implement this understanding in more thorough pre-retirement planning programs.

Click for Kathryn’s Selected Accomplishments
    Published and In Press Refereed Article:
    -Thomas, K.H., Albright, D.L., Phillips, D., Roosevelt, K., Crawley, R., Taylor, S.P. (2018). Mental Health Status in Service Member and Veteran Students at Four-Year Postsecondary Institutions: A Pilot Needs Assessment. Best Practices in Mental Health, 14(1), 1-14.

    CSWE Presenter 2021 APM Meeting:
    -“Implementation of Community-Based Experiential Training Programs to Address Opioid Use Disorder and Other Substance Use Disorders in High Need Areas in the South”
    Danielle Swick, PhD, Yarneccia Dyson, Ph.D., MSW, Kathryn Roosevelt, MSW, Melissa Floyd-Pickard, PhD and Jay Poole, PhD.

    Presentations:

    1. Roosevelt, K., & Eifert, E. (March 26, 2021). Gerontology – The Future of Social Work. UNCG Department of Social Work Lecture Series – Online.
    2. Roosevelt, K. (October 14, 2020). Ageism in the Workplace and Aging in times of COVID. National Association of Social Workers – NC Chapter CEU, Online.
    3. Roosevelt, K. (March 10, 2020). Ageism in the Workplace. University of North Carolina Greensboro, SWK 315, Greensboro, NC

Sally Ryman

MSW from University of Denver

Research Interests: gender identity and sexuality, particularly the concepts of masculinity and femininity for nonbinary individuals; human rights, racial and gender equity, and the United States criminal justice and prison systems

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Sally’s Biography

Sally Ryman received a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Denver and a Bachelor of Arts in English and Russian from Bucknell University. They joined the Ph.D. program after eight years in a community-based health advocacy organization managing programs, supervising care coordinators, and working to improve health equity across Colorado and especially in rural, mountain communities. They also spent just over year providing weekend on-call crisis mental health services in rural Colorado and five months as a home health social worker in rural North Carolina. Prior to a career in human services, Sally spent over ten years in publishing, producing medical journals and political science textbooks and reference books.

Sally’s research interests include gender identity and sexuality, particularly the concepts of masculinity and femininity for nonbinary individuals and gender and identity development for trans* individuals who transition as children compared to those who transition in adulthood. They are also interested in exploring larger questions of human rights, including economic justice in rural America, racial and gender equity, and abolishing the current criminal “justice” and prison systems in the United States. Sally returned to school as a step toward changing the world through education.

Click for Sally’s Selected Accomplishments

I was involved in two sessions at the CHHS Health Disparities Symposium in November 2020:

  • Poster Presentation – Identifying Health Inequities Among Trans HBCU Students.
  • Co-presenter – Teixeira-Poit, S., Doss, C., Shrestha, S., Wade, J., Lee, A., McCain, D.T., Ryman, S., Meyarzum, J., Kendrick, F., & Aiken-Morgan, A.T. (2020). Using technology to support HBCU students experiencing psychosocial risk factors during COVID-19. Health Professionals for Equity in Health and Healthcare Symposium. Greensboro, NC.

I was also a guest speaker for Dr. Gowdy’s masters-level research class regarding the importance of doing research as a social worker.

Wendy Scott

MSW from Clark Atlanta University

Research Interests: trauma, social drivers of health, health disparities and access to care with particular attention to youth involved in child welfare and minority youth. Wendy is interested in integrating research and evaluation practices at the macro and interdisciplinary level to support improved youth and system outcomes.

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Wendy’s Biography

Wendy Scott is a licensed clinical social worker who received her Master of Social Work degree at Clark Atlanta University, Whitney M. Young Jr., School of Social Work. She is currently the Director of Integrated Behavioral Health at a community-based federally qualified health center. She joined the JPh.D. program after 20 years of clinical practice and program management. Having the clinical experience of working with diverse populations across multiple settings has increased her knowledge of the interconnectedness of trauma and human behavior and the responsibility of systems to reduce and prevent retraumatization. Her passion and most of her professional career has been in the area of program development and implementation of new services and initiatives.

Wendy’s research interests include trauma, social drivers of health, health disparities and access to care with particular attention to youth involved in child welfare and minority youth. Wendy is interested in integrating research and evaluation practices at the macro and interdisciplinary level to support improved youth and system outcomes.

Indhira Udofia

MDiv from Duke Divinity School, MSW from UNC – Chapel Hill School of Social Work, STM from Boston University School of Theology

Research Interests: spiritual trauma, African American identity politics and sociocultural functioning

Matriculated Fall 2020

Click for Indhira’s Biography

Indhira Udofia graduated with a Master of Divinity from Duke University and a Masters in Social Work University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill from their joint dual degree program in 2016. After her program, she spent an additional year of study looking at trauma theology and queer theory at Boston University. There, she earned a Master of Sacred Theology (STM) in 2017. In her studies at Boston University, she focused on purity culture and the liberative potential of Black queer women’s relationships. Her current research interest is examining the impact of toxic religiosity within Black Church spaces on African American’s identity formation and sociocultural functioning.

Indhira Udofia has vast working experiences in community and clinical care including therapeutic services, spiritual services, clinical and academic research, writing and collaborative projects. Her extensive work experiences in clinical and community settings since 2009 as well as faith communities (from 2014) shaped her deep passion for helping communities and individuals recover from trauma—especially in spaces of spiritual abuse and grief—in order to be empowered in their own lives and healing. She currently works as a Clincial Lead for a community mental health agency and works as a faith practitioner with a local faith community in Greensboro.

Aalih Hussein

Masters in Social Work from Marwood University

Research Interest: Muslim American women and mental health; Millennial and second generation Muslim American women.

Matriculated Fall 2019

Click for Aalih’s Biography

Aalih Hussein received an accredited Master of Social Work degree at the Marywood University and a Bachelor of Social Work degree from East Stroudsburg University. Upon completion of her Bachelor’s degree, she practiced Oncology Social Work for 3 years. In 2021, she completed a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from University of North Carolina Greensboro. Currently, Aalih works at Everlasting Wellness Counseling as a therapist where she grounds her work in culturally responsive social work practice. She is passionate about working with racial, ethnic, and religious minority populations, such as the children of immigrants and minority women.

Aalih’s research interests include exploring the impact of Islamophobia on the mental health of Second Generation Millneial Muslim American Women. For her dissertation, she leans on the tenets of U.S. Third World Feminism; Differential Consciousness and the Doing Difference theoretical framework to inform her phenomenological study. Aalih hopes to create spaces in academia where diverse lived experiences are valued as a source of knowledge and wisdom. She hopes to engage in a sustained dialogue to create a transformative classroom and body of research.